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When you are ready to head out and explore, here are some easy to follow routes to consider  

Scotland and scenic drives, they go together.

Explore Argyll, and further afield, on a choice of tours. Lochgoilhead and the Cowal peninsula are well placed to use as a base for exploring Scotland. These scenic drives are here to give you a mix of the iconic places to go, such as Glencoe, Oban and Edinburgh, but also on a local level – places that new visitors would have to dig deep to find out about.

Driving times are different in Argyll. It may not look far on the map, but you may find a fair bit of your journey is on single track roads. That is no bad thing. Plan to take time for stopping to enjoy the views, call in to a cafe or gallery, have a walk,or take a picture of the highland cows.

Like all info on my website, these suggestions are my suggestions. The drives are based on years of answering guest questions about where to go and what to see. If you are touring Cowal then be sure to pick up a copy of the Dunoon & Cowal Map. It is Free and is available in the tourist information office and many other outlets around the area.

All the tours start and finish in Lochgoilhead – you can of course join at any other point along the route. Tips: Take a map. The descriptions on the tours are to give you a flavour of what to expect – they are not written like a SatNav. Opening times – some of the visitor attractions are seasonal. Best to check on their website for up to date information.

Have a great day out.

Click on the tour heading to show the details

Cowal - East Tour


History, Art & Gardens Tour

The Cowal Peninsula

Lochgoilhead is in the northern part of the Cowal Peninsula. This area is best discovered in 4 regions – each with a choice of places to visit. Distances are not large. It is possible to make a day of it and combine 2, or more, of the regions.

As you leave Lochgoilhead follow the road up through Hells Glen heading for Dunoon. Have your camera ready. It is worth pulling over to take in the view of the North of Loch Fyne and over towards Inveraray. No. 1 on the map. Leave the glen at the main road and turn left towards Strachur.

‘The Hidden Gallery‘

If you enjoy original art 2 – Fyne Studios – The Hidden Gallery, in the hamlet of Newton, is worth a short diversion when you reach Strachur. The home and studio of 2 local artists who produce bold and colourful work.

Back in to Strachur for the option of calling in to 3 – The Smiddy a small working forge with a long history going back to 1791. Visit a working forge and village blacksmith.

Beautiful Loch Eck | © derekprescott.co.uk

Half way down Loch Eck you leave the main road and follow a single track road as it climbs over a hill in to Glen Finnart. This is a beautiful drive down towards the village of Ardentinny. Before you get to the village there is a sign on your left for Ardentinny Beach. If you are ready to stretch your legs then head  for the car park. You’ll find WC’s, picnic benches, marked walking trails – and a notice board explaining how the area was used for beach landing training during WW2. No. 4 on the map. Look across the loch to Coulport, the storage and loading facility for nuclear submarines.

Head south of Ardentinny, along the shore of Loch Long, and you will come to 5- Quadmania, an outdoor centre. Choose from archery, clay shooting or quad bike rides. The quad biked follow tracks high above the loch – this is the easy and fun way of enjoying views of Loch Long from the mountains of the Arrochar Alps right down to the Firth of Clyde.

‘Historic Kilmun’

History buffs should stop at the 6 – Argyll Mausoleum located adjacent to Kilmun Church in the village of Kilmun. Built in 1790 to house the remains of the Dukes and Earls of Argyll, there is much to find out about the history of this area.

Leaving Kilmun carry on to the junction and turn right.

This tour has a bit of everything – so how about a trip to the rain forest of the Pacific Northwest in Canada. 7 – Pucks Glen Gorge Walk  is a real surprise. Well worth the stop and climb.

‘Snack time at Benmore Cafe’

Time for a coffee & cake break. 8 – Benmore Cafe is the real deal offering home made cakes, scones and snacks. The cafe is at the the entrance to the wonderful 8 – Benmore Botanic Garden which is high on my list of recommended places to go in Cowal.

This is a scenic drive – as you head north along the shore of Loch Eck, look out for the sign to 9 – Jubilee Point picnic site. Gorgeous views across the loch, this site is particularly photogenic. If you are visiting in the summer, you may be lucky, look out for an Osprey.

Carry on North back to Lochgoilhead the way you came.

Cowal Peninsula - West and Tarbert

A circular tour with an optional ferry trip to Tarbert on the Mull of Kintyre.

The Cowal Peninsula

Lochgoilhead is in the northern part of the Cowal Peninsula. This area is best discovered in 4 regions – each with a choice of places to visit. Distances are not large. It is possible to make a day of it and combine 2, or more, of the regions.

As you leave Lochgoilhead follow the road up through Hells Glen on the B839. As you start to come down from the top of the glen No. 1 on the map  have your camera ready. It is worth pulling over to take in the view of the north of Loch Fyne and over towards Inveraray. Leave the glen at the main road and turn left onto the A815.

Travel south towards Strachur and turn right at the junction where the sign shows the Bute Ferry. Heading through Glendaruel you come to the turn-off for the village of Tighnabruaich.

‘The Kyles of Bute Viewpoint’

You are now on a stretch of single track roads with passing places. The road follows the shoreline before climbing north to the 2 – Kyles of Bute Viewpoint. It’s a picture postcard view and makes for a fantastic photo. There’s a panoramic map pointing out the landmarks and history of the area.

Carry on down to the village of Tighnabruaich. My must stop place here is the 3 – Tighnabruaich Gallery on the main street. Quality work on display. There are some coffee shops if you are ready for a break.

Follow the shore road towards Kames and the signs for the Portavadie Ferry.

‘Jump in – the waters lovely’

Follow the signs for Portavadie and turn off just before the ferry slipway turn left in to 4 – Portavadie Marina. This comes as quite a surprise considering the country you have just travelled through. Ultra modern, with a choice of places to have a snack or a meal. Take time to go have a look at the Pool & Spa, complete with an infinity pool overlooking Loch Fyne. Better still, pack your costume and make this a destination.

Image courtesy of Portavadie Spa

‘Over the sea to Tarbert’

How about an optional trip to the Mull of Kintyre? As part of a fun day out we head down here, park the car, and head over on the 5 – Caledonian Macbrayne Ferry to the picturesque harbour town of Tarbert. It is a 25 minute trip and the views north and south are worth it. You can walk into the town from the slipway and spend an easy hour or two visiting the castle, galleries, shops and watching the yachts come and go.

When you are ready to leave Portavadie, this tour takes you north to Otter Ferry and the single track road to 6 – Inver Restaurant at Strathlachlan. Inver is one of the most talked about restaurants in the area. Drop in for refreshment and view their menu. This is a place you may want to come back to for dinner.

For art lovers the final stop is the 7 – Fyne Studios – The Hidden Gallery, in the hamlet of Newton. Easy to miss, look out for the sign by the road and turn off down to the small village of Newton. This is the home and studio of 2 local artists who produce bold and colourful work.

If you’ve followed the route this far – you’ll be ready for home. Half an hour back to Lochgoilhead

North Cowal - Loch Fyne and Inveraray

Gardens, Castle, the Jail and Fyne Ales

The Cowal Peninsula

Lochgoilhead is in the northern part of the Cowal Peninsula. This area is best discovered in 4 regions – each with a choice of places to visit. Distances are not large. It is possible to make a day of it and combine 2, or more, of the regions.

Part of the pleasure of this tour is that there are so many things to see within a short drive of each attraction. Take a half day, or do the lot and make a day of it.

As you leave Lochgoilhead follow the road up through Hells Glen on the B839. As you start to come down from the top of the glen No. 1 on the map  have your camera ready. It is worth pulling over to take in the view of the north of Loch Fyne and over towards Inveraray. Leave the glen at the main road and turn right onto the A815.

‘The Gruffalo Trail’

Next junction turn left onto the A83 heading for the village of Cairndow. You soon come to 2 – Ardkinglas Woodland Garden. The gardens have a Gruffalo Trial, and this is popular with the youngsters. Turn left off the main road when you reach the village and follow the signs to the gardens. These are not formal gardens, more of a woodland wonderland with a choice of trails along the hill side.

Re-join the main road and carry on to the head of the loch. Look out for the Fyne Ales signs. Take the single track road a short way up the glen until you come to 3 – Fyne Ales. Join a brewery tour or relax in their Tap Room where you can sample their beers or have a coffee. We like to combine a stop here with a walk up the glen road. There are usually highland cows around and with the hills in the background this is a picture opportunity.

Heading towards Inveraray you next come to 4 – Loch Fyne Oysters. If you are not ready to eat, you should visit the Deli which has a superb range of local sea food. Next door is the Here We Are a local information centre as well as The Tree Shop Garden Centre. So, three stops for the price of one.

Back in the car to Inveraray. As you come round the final bend in the road before reaching the town, you are met with a picture postcard view. Be ready. As you cross the hump-back bridge, look right for views of your next stop 5 – Inveraray Castle, home to the Duke of Argyll. The grounds and castle are open to the public.

Image courtesy of Inveraray Castle

‘Step back in time to a 19th-century prison’

6 – Inveraray is a must-stop place for visitors. There are a number of attractions worth seeking out. First would be Inveraray Jail located at the top of the main street. This is a living museum giving a fascinating insight into the history and conditions of justice in the 19th century. Nearby, tucked away up a lane, is the Stable Gallery, packed full of original art, mainly by local artists.

Inveraray has a choice of cafes, restaurants and shops, including the Loch Fyne Whiskies Shop. Head down to the shore by the war memorial and enjoy an ice cream while taking in the view over Loch Fyne.

This is the furthest point on the tour. Follow the same route back to Lochgoilhead.

Loch Lomond - & Trossachs National Park

Falls of Dochart | © stock solutions | Adobe

Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park

One of two national parks in Scotland, it includes 21 Munros, 19 Corbetts and two forest parks (Queen Elizabeth, and Argyll). This trip takes in all of the four regions making up the park: Cowal, Loch Lomond, Breadalbane and The Trossachs. With pretty villages, mountains, lochs and history, it all adds up to a full day out.

Stop at the ‘Rest’

Leave Lochgoilhead heading up to the viewpoint at the Rest and be Thankful on the B838. Take the time to stop for views of the Arrochar Alps, Glen Croe and the old military road, which is still used when the main road is closed.

Turn right onto the A83 to and then left at Tarbet onto the A82.

31 steps for a top view

This section of road twists and turns its way along the northern stretch of Loch Lomond. This second viewpoint stop will not disappoint. Turn right in to the Inveruglas car park opposite the Loch Sloy power station. 1 – Loch Lomond Viewpoint. A short path through the trees brings you to the eight metres high, pyramid-shaped An Ceann Mòr viewing tower. Climb the 31 steps to the top and take in the views of Loch Lomond and the surrounding mountains.

Turn right leaving the car park and head for Crianlarich. At Crianlarich follow the signs for Perth on the A85.

Falls of Dochart, Killin at the west end of Loch Tay, Perthshire, Scotland

13 miles after Crianlarich follow the A827 for a short diversion to 2 – Killin. It is worth coming down to see the white waters of the beautiful Falls of Dochart which run through the village. Walk across the bridge to fully enjoy the waterfalls. Across the road is the The Falls of Dochart Inn. Dating from the 1800’s, it is an inviting place to call in to if you are ready for a refreshment.

Travel back up to the A85  and turn left. Follow the signs for Callander. All along the route you are surrounded by mountain scenery.

Rob Roy MacGregor – Outlaw or hero?

Look out for the signs for Rob Roy’s Grave at 3 – Balquhidder. Leave the main road and travel along the 2 miles to the Balquhidder Parish Church. If you are at all interested in Scottish history, this stop is a real treat. Take some time and visit the Friendship Room in the church. The walls have information panels telling the story, not only of Rob Roy MacGregor, but also about some of their first ministers in the church. A fascinating insight in to life in this beautiful location.

Navigation accidents happen – It’s all part of the adventure

We turned right leaving the church thinking we would end up back on the main road. Wrong. We followed a single track road for 8 miles as it made it’s way along the shores of what we found out later was Loch Voil and Loch Doine. We arrived at a dead-end called Inverlochlarig which had a car park area and information boards. This seems to be a popular spot for heading off on a number of walks. It was no hardship heading back the way we came. This was October. We drove under a canopy of wonderful Autumn colours, we stopped a number of times to take in the views across the loch, we had a number of Wow moments and enjoyed this unplanned for excursion. This diversion is not marked on the map on this page – but if you want to have a drive to a wild and remote part of the Trossachs – do it.

Make your way back to the A85 via the signs for Strathyre and head for the popular town of Callander. One of the of the first places in Scotland built to a careful plan, there is an interesting walking route round the town. Pick the map up in the Tourist Information Centre. Plenty of choice for shopping and places to eat. If you are planning on taking the Loch Katrine sightseeing cruise you can buy your ticket here. That way you can re-confirm the sailing time and you will not be disappointed if you arrive to find the trip fully booked.

Steamship Sir Walter Scott | © Mhairi McClair | Adobe

A trip on the steamship Sir Walter Scott

You leave Callander the way you came. Follow the clearly marked sign for The Trossachs Trail on the A821. This beautiful drive takes you along the shore of Loch Venachar and Loch Achray until you come to the turn-off to the Trossachs Pier. This is where you board the 5 – Steamship Sir Walter Scott for a sightseeing cruise on Loch Katrine. You have to plan your trip to allow for the times of the sailings. Loch cruises are an easy and relaxing way to take in the scenery. The steamship has been sailing for over 100 years. This is pretty special.

Back on the A821 to complete The Trossachs Trail through the Queen Elizabeth Forest Park before you descend in to Aberfoyle. The town has an attractive main street with individual shops, cafés and restaurants. The Scottish Wool Centre has live sheep shows and a demonstration with working sheepdogs.

Time for home. Use your map and travel via Drymen and Balloch to the A82 heading north along Loch Lomond. You should be in familiar territory by now.

Finish your circular day tour by travelling back to Lochgoilhead via the Rest and be Thankful.

Tips: Take a map. The descriptions on the tours are to give you a flavour of what to expect – they are not written like a SatNav. Opening times – some of the visitor attractions are seasonal. Best to check on their website for up to date information.

Isle of Bute - and Mount Stuart

Sculpture, Victorian seafront town and Gothic splendour

As you leave Lochgoilhead follow the road up through Hells Glen on the B839.  Leave the glen at the main road and turn left onto the A815.

At Strachur turn right at the junction onto the A886 and follow the sign to the Bute Ferry. Enjoy a drive south through Glendaruel to the village of Colintraive.

‘Coal Ruadh – worth seeking out’

Before you head for the ferry take the minor road on the right and make your way to 1 – Coal Ruadh Sculpture Park  You have to check their web page first for directions and opening hours. The location of the park overlooking the Kyles of Bute is pretty special, but the sculptures and artwork dotted around the grounds make finding this attraction well worth it.

Head on to the Bute Ferry. No need to book. Turn up and pay and board.

It only takes minutes and before you know it, you are on the Isle of Bute.

Head in to the main town of 2 – Rothesay and allow some time get to know this Victorian seaside resort.

‘How did this place end up here?’

Mount Stuart House courtesy of Mount Stuart

The real draw on Bute is the magnificent gardens and visitor attraction of 3 – Mount Stuart House. They say it best themselves: A triumph of the imagination, an architectural masterpiece. Britain’s most astounding Victorian Gothic mansion and one of the world’s great houses. Who would argue with that.

If you do all three stops on this tour, you will have a full day.

Glencoe - Circular Tour - Wow!

Iconic Scotland, Rannoch Moor, Glencoe and Castle Stalker.

A day tour packed full of memorable views of Scotland.

Leave Lochgoilhead heading up to the Rest and be Thankful on the B838. Take the time to stop for views of Glen Croe, the old military road and the Arrochar Alps.

Turn right onto the A83 to and then left at Tarbet onto the A82.

‘By yon bonnie banks’

This section of road twists and turns its way along the northern stretch of Loch Lomond. The best views of this part of the loch are from the car park just past the Sloy power station. 1 – Loch Lomond Viewpoint

When you are driving through Tyndrum, look out for the Real Food Cafe. An award winning restaurant that delivers what they say on their website. Probably a bit too early to call in on your way north – but keep it in mind if you are heading back this ay.

As you leave Tyndrum on the A82 the scenery opens up. You may see walkers at intervals on the right side of the road. This is the famous West Highland Way Long Distance Path, 96 miles from the outskirts of Glasgow to Fort William. This is one of the few parts where the path is visible from the road. You may well be inspired to come back one day and do a section, or all, of the path.

The drive across Rannoch Moor comes to an end as the mountain of Buachaille Etive Mor comes into view. Dominating the skyline ahead you should pull over and take the time enjoy the sheer scale of the area. Stunning locations have always been a feature of the James Bond movies. This is on of the locations where part of the Skyfall movie was filmed.

‘Massacre and mountains – welcome to Glencoe’

You are fast approaching the main event on this tour, Glencoe. As you head through the glen there is wonderful mountain scenery on both sides. There are a number of car parking places in the glen, so make sure you stop. The glen is famous for it’s climbing, but there are some low level paths from the car parks with easy walking. It is worth taking a bit of time to stretch your legs and take in the scenery away from the road.

Glencoe © Radek Sturgolewski Adobe

Also famous for the Glencoe Massacre, you can learn all about the history and wild landscape by stopping at the 2 – Glencoe Visitor Centre before you come to the village.

Depending how much time you have taken to come this far, you may want to head back using the route you came on.

The alternative is to make a circuit of the tour and follow the A828 towards Oban. Fine scenery as you hug the coast road by Loch Leven and Loch Linnhe. Travel south for 15 miles and look out for the signs to 3 – Castle Stalker View. The castle is a renowned Scottish landmark – you may recognise it from the Monty Python Film the Holy Grail. You are more likely to recognise it from postcards. It is in a spectacular west coast setting. There is an excellent gift shop and cafe by the car park.

Heading south you cross the Connel Bridge. Depending on the tides you may see the 4 – Falls or Lora below. They appear when the tide level in the Firth of Lorn drops below the level of the water in Loch Etive. Impressive.

Travel home via the A85 to the turn off to the A819 just before Dalmally. Not far down the A819 you come will probably see cars on both sides of the road parked in lay-bys. This is the viewpoint for 5 – Kilchurn Castle. Another recognisable landmark and picture opportunity.

Return to Lochgoilhead via Inveraray.

Oban - Historic Castles, Hollow Mountains and McCaigs Folly

Historic Castles, Hollow Mountains and McCaigs Folly

Oban, a comfortable 90 minute drive from Lochgoilhead, takes you along the shores of Lochs Fyne, Awe and Etive, as well as by some interesting visitor attractions. This is a day out with real choice. Take to the water, take to the air, or just enjoy a walk around the busy harbour.

As you leave Lochgoilhead follow the road through Hells Glen on the B839. Leave the glen at the main road and turn right onto the A815 and then left onto the A83 at the next junction. Turn right in Inveraray on the A819 following the sign for Oban. You are on your way.

Travelling down from the highest part of the A815, the view of Loch Awe, backed by the Ben Cruachan mountain range, comes in to view. Before you come to the Dalmally junction you come will probably see cars on both sides of the road parked in lay-bys. This is the place to get the camera out for 5 – Kilchurn Castle.

The view from here is across the loch. It is possible to explore the castle. At the T junction turn left and you soon see an unmarked road on your left. The entrance is not sign-posted. Park and follow the path by the river until you see the castle. There are excellent information boards which help you bring to life what it was like in the days the castle was inhabited. It is in a lovely location on the shores of the loch.

‘The Hollow Mountain’

Travel on through the village of Loch Awe and you will come to 2 – Cruachan – The hollow mountain. This is a power station built in the heart of the mountain. Join one of the tours for a trip deep into the mountain and learn more in the Visitor Centre.

Carrying on towards Oban you come to the Connel Bridge. Depending on the tides you may see the 3 – Falls or Lora. They appear when the tide level in the Firth of Lorn drops below the level of the water in Loch Etive. Impressive. The other reason this location is included is because of Poppies Garden Centre and Restaurant. Keep this place in mind for on your way home. There are plenty of places to eat in Oban, but we like the loch view from Poppies.

The Oban skyline | © Scott McLean | Adobe

“Oban – Gateway to the Isles’

Oban is in an attractive setting with the hills behind the town leading down to the main shopping area and harbour. The ferries coming and going to Mull, Lismore and the Outer Hebrides just add to the location.

Park first and then head for the Tourist Information Centre to pick up a map of the town. From there you can walk around the harbour, there is plenty shopping as well as seafood outlets, cafes and restaurants.

The top visitors attractions include McCaig Tower set on the hill above the town. It’s a steep walk up from the harbour but you have the option of taking the car and parking at the entrance. The reward is the views over the harbour to the islands. In the middle of town is the Oban Distillery. One of Scotland’s oldest sources of malt whisky, you can join a tour and finish with a taste sensation of their 14 year old malt. The next one may seem strange on your holiday, but the Oban War and Peace Museum is near to the information centre. Well worth visiting to learn more about the strategic role played by Oban during the war years. Dunstaffnage Castle and Chapel is also recommended by the Tourist Office. 3 miles from the centre of town. It has an  interesting history with connections to Robert the Bruce and Flora  MacDonald (the one who helped Bonnie Prince Charlie escape).

‘Climb onboard’

With a bit of planning it is possible to include a trip to the Isle of Mull on the Caledonian Macbrayne ferry. It is a 45 minute trip from Oban to Craignure on Mull. Arriving in to Oban by ferry is surely one of the best ways of appreciating what a pretty location this is. It is a grand way to spend an afternoon.

‘Up, up and away’

There is another way to see Oban. Just north, over the Connel Bridge, Fly Scenic Scotland operate a range of sightseeing flights. You can book ahead or you can take a chance and just turn up. This is a real treat. A fun way to view this rugged coastline as seen from the air.

Return to Lochgoilhead the way you came. Don’t forget about Poppies at Connel if you need a refreshment.

Edinburgh - So much to see and do on a day out to Edinburgh

Can we do Edinburgh in a day?

Yes. A day trip from Lochgoilhead to Edinburgh is very doable and it makes for a great day out. If it’s your first visit – a little pre-planning will help you get the most out of your trip.

Parking – Park & Ride or city centre?

Driving in Edinburgh can be challenging. Parking can be even more of a challenge. Consider your options.

Check the AA Route Planner

Driving time from Lochgoilhead and post codes to use are:

Lochgoilhead – PA24 8AA

Ingliston Park & Ride – 1hr 56min – EH28 8LN

Castle Terrace Car Park – 2hr 20min – EH1 2EW

Parking

Option 1: Free parking on the outskirts of Edinburgh at the Ingliston Park & Ride. Park the car and jump on the tram which will take you right in to the heart of the city. Smooth and comfortable, this is the hassle free way to get into town.

Option 2: If you opt to drive into town a SatNav will help if you find the NCP Car Park at Castle Terrace. Conveniently located close to Edinburgh Castle and Princes Street Gardens.

Edinburgh Castle | © stevanzz | Adobe

Now you are in town, what next?

Scotland’s top visitor attraction. Edinburgh Castle. You can’t miss it. Sitting on top of an extinct volcano, it dominates the skyline. The view over the city from the castle is worth the climb. Highly recommended to join one of the guided tours, or you can go-it-alone with an audio tour.

The castle sits at the top of the Royal Mile. There are a number of places to visit within easy walking distance. To get a feel for what life in Edinburgh used to be like you have to go to Mary King’s Close – hidden streets, frozen in time since the 17th Century. You need to book this ahead – it is so popular you are unlikely to be able to turn up and join a one hour tour.

Time is short but other options on the Royal Mile would include: The Camera Obscura, St. Gile’s Cathedral, John Knox House, The Peoples Story Museum, The Palace of Holyrood or how about The Scottish Parliament.

From the Royal Mile it is an easy walk down to the New Town. It’s not that new. Built between 1767 and 1850, it is famous for its Georgian period architecture. Princess Street, Rose Street and George Street are all worth exploring.

Between the old and the new town you’ll find Princes Street Gardens. An oasis of peace in the heart of the city. Although there is a huge choice of places to eat, you can consider buying a take-away snack and relaxing in this green space taking in the view.

Image courtesy of Edinburgh Bus Tours

‘Hop on – Hop off Sightseeing Bus Tours’

Exploring a new city the easy way. Head for the Scott Monument towards the east end of Princes Street. Nearby is the starting point for a number of sightseeing bus tours. Get a unique perspective from an open-top bus. With the commentary and someone else doing the driving, you’ll see and learn a lot more of Edinburgh than on foot. If nothing else, it will show you that there is so much more to see in this beautiful city for your next visit.

‘Edinburgh Tour Guides’

If you want a locals insight on your visit, then consider hiring a guide.

The Edinburgh Festival Fringe

The largest art festival in the world is held during the last 3 weeks in August. If you are visiting during this time it makes for a great day out. Plan ahead and book a ticket or just enjoy the atmosphere along the Royal Mile with the street entertainers.

A day visit can only ever scratch the surface of a city like Edinburgh. If you do nothing more then come and explore the city on foot you’ll have seen enough to discover why Edinburgh is one of the most beautiful cities in Europe.

‘Stay over’

Want to see more? There is a huge choice of places to stay. When I overnight in Edinburgh I stay at Garlands Guest House. Convenient for the Playhouse Theatre and within walking distance to Princes Street.

Single track roads – easy when you know how

Handy advice for our visitors from abroad